Posts Tagged ‘surrogacy dispute’

Louisa Ghevaert recognised as leading expert in UK fertility and parenting law

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

I’m delighted to be ranked by Chambers and Partners UK Guide 2015 as a leading legal expert in surrogacy, fertility and parenting law at Michelmores LLP.

Chambers & Partners identifies and ranks the most outstanding law firms and lawyers in the UK and in over 180 jurisdictions throughout the world. Their Guides are trusted by clients across the globe when they need to find a reliable and capable legal expert. Chambers UK Guide covers 50 cities and counties in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland and its rankings are the result of in-depth discussions and interviews with both lawyers and clients.

Chambers and Partners UK 2015: says about Louisa Ghevaert

“Louisa Ghevaert is a recognised expert in surrogacy, fertility and parenting law matters.  She has experience in dealing with complex parenting matters, particularly those with an international element”.

This follows on from my ranking in Chambers and Partners UK 2014 edition which said “sources describe her as an expert in a very difficult and specialised area of the law – she knows her subject extremely well and gives knowledgeable and sensible advice”.

Chambers and Partners UK 2015: says about Michelmores Family and Fertility Law Team

The specialist Family and Fertility Law Team at Michelmores LLP is said to have a “strong reputation for advising clients on high value matrimonial finance matters and a range of children law matters.  Notable specialist expertise in surrogacy, adoption and child abduction matters, as well as issues arising from same-sex relationships”.

If you would like more information about fertility, parenting or family law please contact me by email Louisa.ghevaert@michelmores.com or by telephone +44 (0)207 788638.


Louisa Ghevaert joins Michelmores

Monday, August 25th, 2014

I’m delighted to join Michelmores Solicitors as a partner to head up a specialist fertility, family and parenting law practice. Michelmores have offices in Chancery Lane in London, Bristol and Exeter.

I can be contacted by email louisa.ghevaert@michelmores.com, by telephone +44 (0)207 7886382 or visit www.michelmores.com.

My award-winning, innovative and pioneering legal practice includes international and UK surrogacy, donor conception, co-parenting, fertility treatment law, posthumous conception, inter-country adoption, divorce and finances, cohabitation and complex family and children law.

I’m ranked as a leading lawyer in fertility and family law by Chambers & Partners UK 2014, which says ‘Sources describe her as “an expert in a very difficult and specialised area of the law- she knows her subject extremely well and gives knowledgeable and sensible advice”.’ I’m also ranked as a leading expert by The Legal 500 UK 2013.

I’ve represented fertility patients, parents and intended parents in numerous well known UK fertility law cases including, embryo storage and surrogacy disputes, landmark applications for parental orders in the English Family Court following commercial surrogacy and disputes over NHS fertility treatment funding.

My specialist fertility and family law practice was High Commended at The Law Society Excellence Awards 2013 in the Category of Business Development and Innovation.  I was also shortlisted at The Family Law Awards 2013 in the Category of Most Innovative Family Lawyer of The Year.

I’m joined by Rachel Cook, a leading authority on adoption and children law.  Rachel’s specialist expertise brings added depth to the fertility, family and parenting team at Michelmores.  Rachel is a member of the British Association of Adoption and Fostering Legal Group Advisory Committee, a member of the Department of Education Adoption Stakeholder Group, an Independent Panel Chair of a Local Authority Adoption Agency and a trustee to a large Voluntary Adoption Agency.

 

Three reasons why surrogacy can go wrong

Friday, October 12th, 2012

Surrogacy offers hope of a much wanted family to many.  It can bring immense happiness and joy.  However, it can be a risky business and not all experiences are positive.

Your surrogate fails to give valid consent

A landmark legal case in the English High Court decided earlier this month, D and L (Minors) (Surrogacy) 2012, illustrates the problems that can happen when a surrogate mother fails to co-operate and relinquish her legal status for the child.  In D and L, a  UK gay couple applied for parental orders for their twin boys, conceived with the help of an Indian surrogate mother through a clinic in Hyderabad, India.  They never met their Indian surrogate mother, dealing instead with the Indian clinic directly.  The couple were unable to obtain signed forms from their Indian surrogate mother consenting  to the grant of parental orders to enable them to become the twins’ legal parents under UK law. Their Indian clinic refused to help secure their surrogate’s written consent and the couple were unable to trace her themselves after the twins’ birth.  All they received was a package in the post, containing a single sheet of paper with an obscene gesture on it.

The couple did everything they could to comply with UK legal requirements and they were badly let down by their clinic. Following complex court proceedings, the judge eventually granted them parental orders and dispensed with the requirement for the legal consent of their surrogate who could not be found.  The judge did, however, issue a warning that future intended parents should learn the lesson that clear lines of communication with their surrogate are established to ensure they can obtain the necessary consent after the six week cooling off period post birth.

Your surrogate has a change of heart

Although rare, a surrogate mother sometimes has a change of heart and decides she wishes to keep the baby.  This can happen for a variety of reasons and if a dispute arises, it creates difficult and challenging legal proceedings and the court will make a decision in the best interests of the child.  As surrogacy agreements are not legally binding in the UK, this creates tension between the rights of surrogate mothers and intended parents.

The pregnancy is unsuccessful

Sadly, not all surrogate pregnancies result in a live birth.  This can be devastating for all involved and it raises difficult issues.  This can hit home even harder in circumstances where intended parents have already had a long and difficult fertility journey.

With so many risks, there is no substitute for obtaining expert legal advice, working with reputable clinics and agencies and maintaining direct links with the surrogate throughout the process.  If you would like to discuss your situation in more detail or you would like more information about surrogacy law, a parental order or what to do in the event of a surrogacy dispute please email me louisa.ghevaert@michelmores.com.

Ukrainian surrogacy law dispute: TV coverage places Ukrainian surrogacy under the spotlight

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Ukrainian surrogacy has recently been placed in the spotlight following rare in-depth TV coverage of what’s reported to be Ukraine’s first ever surrogacy dispute.  The TV programme ‘Podrobnosti’, filmed by Ukrainian TV Channel (Inter TV), covers the story of Ukrainian surrogate mother Irina Morozova who gave birth to twin boys  following a surrogacy arrangement with Italian intended parents and who is now embroiled in a legal dispute to retain care of them.

I was delighted to be interviewed for the TV programme as an expert in UK surrogacy law, alongside leading Ukrainian professionals and experts including an official from the Ukrainian Ministry of Health and Vitoriya Rogatinskaya the director of the international surrogacy organization ‘The Supportive Motherhood’ and Jill Hawkins (the UK’s most well known surrogate mother).

The TV programme provides a rare glimpse of the surrogacy sector in the Ukraine and a direct interview with the Ukrainian surrogate mother Irina Morozova.  Irina has been battling legally to retain care of the twins she gave birth to for the last year and a half .  She seriously doubts the intentions of the Italian intended parents who commissioned the twins’ birth.  Shockingly, she is worried that if she were to hand over the twins they would be sold for organ donation.

The programme reports that there is a growing surrogacy market in the Ukraine and that around 150 surrogate babies are born in the Ukraine to foreign intended parents each year. There is no international harmonization of surrogacy law and this can create all sorts of complex legal issues for intended parents, who can experience immigration problems bringing their child home after the birth and an often challenging legal process to obtain full parental status for their child.  Irina’s story graphically demonstrates that surrogacy is not risk free and that surrogacy law disputes can arise, bringing further challenges for all those involved in the process.

If you would like more information about the legal issues associated with international surrogacy, including surrogacy in the Ukraine please email me louisa.ghevaert@michelmores.com.

International surrogacy: US judge denies restitution following surrogacy scam

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

On Monday (18 June 2012), a US federal judge in San Diego denied a claim brought by Sharp Healthcare for reimbursement of approximately $600,000 in medical costs for the medical care of seven surrogate babies delivered as a result of an international baby-selling ring.

This case follows on from the conviction of a former prominent Poway surrogacy lawyer, Theresa Erickson, earlier this year for fraud and her sentence to a 14 month term (with five months to be spent in prison) for her part in the surrogacy scam.  Two others, Carla Chambers of Las Vegas and Hilary Neiman of Maryland received similar sentences for their parts in the scam as well.

The seven surrogate born babies were delivered at Sharp hospitals.  Several of the babies were premature and medical costs for their care exceeded $600,000.  The intended parents respectively paid between $100,000 and $150,000 for their surrogacy arrangements and believed everything was legal and that there was medical insurance in place to cover medical costs.  The intended parents were then shocked and horrified when they were presented with huge medical bills and discovered these were not covered by health insurance and the illegality of their surrogacy arrangements came to light.

Sharp Healthcare entered into agreements with the majority of the intended parents and accepted more than $235,000 in payments.  However, this left a shortfall of approximately $600,000 which it sought to recover from Theresa Erickson.  Their claims were denied in five of the seven cases by US District Judge Anthony Battaglia. The judge ordered only a few thousand dollars of reimbursement to the remaining two sets of intended parents who had been listed in the government’s criminal case as victims (the other five sets of intended parents had not been listed as victims in the government’s case).

The outcome of this case graphically illustrates once again what can happen when surrogacy arrangements go wrong.  The legal issues surrounding surrogacy are complex and even more so in cases involving international surrogacy arrangements. It is therefore critical that anyone contemplating a surrogacy arrangement fully gets to grips with the legal issues and implications from the outset and ensures they have confidence in the people with whom they work.

If you would like to discuss your situation in more detail or you would like more information about surrogacy law and the specific legal issues associated with international surrogacy please email me louisa.ghevaert@michelmores.com.